Sedimentary rocks in the Zambezi valley…

Sedimentary rocks in the Zambezi Valley

Geologically, there are lots of things going on in this pic…I took it fairly close to where the road crosses the Ume River, after the turn off to the Bumi Hills. It fascinates me that one layer of sediment is cut off and then another layer is added at a different angle. The pic below is a close up of this rock:

Sedimentary rocks in the Zambezi Valley

Shortly after, I saw this rock…the layers very clear:

Sedimentary rocks in the Zambezi Valley

A closeup…

Sedimentary rocks in the Zambezi Valley

I also  have a writing blog. Please take a look here: https://frankiekay.wordpress.com/my-books/

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Tree canopy

There is something primal about a tree canopy and it’s difficult to capture in an image.

This one, in Vocolo, Filabusi covered the road and gave me that cozy feeling you get from a shady tree overhead. I love the little dark window, calling…

Tree

I couldn’t resist sitting under this one.

Msasa Trees

I wonder if humans evolved under this kind of canopy. I can quite see myself living here…

Msasa Trees

Then…sitting there, I saw this…!

Msasa Trees

Tell me this tree doesn’t talk to you? Call you? Well it did me!

Msasa Trees

 

And how is this arch of trees as in invitation to Matopos?

Matopos

This (below) is a tree very near to the orbicular granite site at Diana’s Pools in the Matopos.Matopos Tree

Matopos TreeI also have a writing blog. Please take a look: https://frankiekay.wordpress.com/my-books/

 

Sunset through the trees…

Sunset through the trees

I took these photographs very close to Tashinga Camp in Matusadona National Park.

Sunset through the trees

We had been driving all day, trying to get to the Matusadona Mountains I had heard so much about…I’m embarrassed to say, we didn’t get there  – the roads were too bad. This is a very difficult admission for me to make – she who prides herself on going anywhere!

Sunset through the trees

 

Below…what is left of the road in some places!!!

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I also have a writing blog – please have a look – https://frankiekay.wordpress.com/my-books/

Bella…

Again!

I’m a little worried Bella could become too much of a feature on my blog. I can’t resist her, she is such a beautiful creature. I go out with the camera, and after a while find myself simply watching her, the way she moves: sometimes leaping, others, just that languid bound, almost nonchalant…always perfect landings too! Bella never trips over her high heels!

Bella

Look at that mascara, those green eyes!

Bella

And this is her warning look:

Bella

In Bella language, this is “Come one step closer dog, and…” I have yet to get her hissing, but I’m sure it won’t be very long! She is nasty to the dog, who really just wants to play! He is one of those dogs who only retreats when I tell him to get out. Get out to Rufus means out of THIS room and into say, the kitchen! With the advent of Bella, who understands that OUT means right out. Like right of the house RIGHT NOW! Poor old Roof…

Bella

I’m going to have no gecko’s or lizards left soon – she catches something several times a day and brings it into the room for TomTom…who plays with them and then leaves them around for me to squish!!! Eeuw.

As ever, I leave my favorite for last…

Bella

I also have a writing blog – please take a look – https://frankiekay.wordpress.com/my-books/

Snot Apple…

Snot Apple

This is the flower of the snot apple or Uxakuxaku. http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=139720

Snot Apple

Its like chewing gum. Its eaten when its dry and has split and sort of oozed out of the cracks. And you chew and chew and chew! I think its an acquired taste! You can’t eat Uxakuxaku politely or with your mouth closed!

 

snot appleI love the way the flowers fade to bright red.

snot apple

In this pic you can sort of see the hairy fruit developing. I took these pics in January, in Filabusi.

snot apple

And they look like this by July! I took this photo at Khami Ruins

 

Inthabazinduna…

I have been asked on numerous occasions to photograph Inthabazinduna which is just outside Bulawayo on the Harare road. It’s a fairly obvious landmark, a long, flat topped hill that sticks out above the surrounding, flat flat plateau…But actually, its not that easy to photograph – it just comes out as a long flat hill in an otherwise boring plateau!

So I decided I should maybe get up close, and perhaps it would come out better.

Very near Inthabazinduna is a little round hill, the same height, known as Maxim Hill. This one was easy to photograph…

Inthabazinduna

I’m told its called Maxim Hill (or sometimes Maxim Kopie) because it was the last place the Maxim Gun was used against the Ndebele during the war in 1898.

Inthabazinduna Inthabazinduna Inthabazinduna

This is the view of Maxim Hill taken coming down Inthabazinduna with the stunning skies behind. Rain here in dry Matabeleland is always welcomed with intense relief, jubilation and much running about in it! This rain storm soon moved over and belted down in buckets! Below is a pic of the same hill, this time shrouded in much needed rain…

Inthabazinduna

I am afraid the rain foiled my efforts at photographing Inthabazinduna! It came down in sheets and I couldn’t even see the road! But I did open the window and take this one…:

Inthabazinduna

As you can see, it is a boring flat topped hill with a history!

This is what is on top of Inthabazinduna though! A view of Bulawayo and the cement factory (wow…!) and an idea of the vastness of the African plateau – one of the oldest pieces of Gondwanaland remaining. This flat topped hill, and Maxim Hill nearby are all that remains of an even more ancient plateau…

Inthabazinduna

Inthabazinduna

The rocks, Inthabazinduna is made of. (Above.)

The view over Bulawayo and the vast plateau…

Inthabazinduna

And within minutes, the rain came down, the lightening struck and I was in four wheel drive – the mud in that area is legendary!

Inthabazinduna