Farm Fences…


This photo is taken at “Oudeplaas” Farm


Windy Night…


This dead tree is in the driveway, and looked very dramatic with clouds scudding across the sky behind.  The wind was blowing SO hard, I struggled to hold the camera still. This is my first effort at long exposure night photography – ably assisted by my brother in law – to be honest, all I did was press the time delay shutter!!!


Taken earlier of the moon rise over the sea.


Slightly different angle…but I don’t like the strong light from the left in this photo


Sunset Rock, at Cape St Francis…

We were told about this place – given directions. When we got there, we found a car park FULL of cars and people, everywhere! If I’d been on my own, I’d have just kept right on driving!  P1260817

In this direction, however, only a few fishermen…


I’m told this road goes along the coast for miles…(above)

I’m guessing people come here to take sunset photos for a reason!



As the sun went down, the light changed and the blues became deeper…



Facing the other way – the people were still there!



C J Rhodes’ stables…

Just outside of the REPS school grounds is this wonderful old building:


C J Rhodes lived on top of a hill a short distance away. His house is no longer there, but this stable block remains. Built with huge granite boulder foundations and red brick above, its stood for more than one hundred years.



It needs renovating now – the sash windows are in a sad way, and the staircase has rotted away. The top deck is made of solid teak and I think the winch, for hauling stockfeed up, is still all there.


It seems Rhodes’ horses lived well! As a kid, I knew a man who insisted he had been alive in Rhodes’ time. He reported that Rhodes didn’t ride very well – probably why he wanted to build a railway all the way through Africa.



A short distance away are the Matopos Research Centre buildings – also old colonial style:





REPS School, Matopos…

I’ve been wanting to take photos of this marvellous old school for some time. Built in the old colonial style, its white buildings are clearly visible when traveling to the Matopos.



Pictured above are the boarding hostels which are now for both boys and girls.

P1260370.jpgThe wing on the left is the girl’s hostel, the main entrance on the right.


What a lovely view from the hostels – the Matopos very close by – perfect playground for energetic boys at boarding school.


Across the lawns is this stunning chapel. When I took the pic below, the sun was streaming into the round window in the front gable.


Please excuse this pic! My interiors are not very good! Dito, the image below….the dining hall!


I’m much better at taking exterior shots! This, below, is the dining hall at REPS.P1260373


I didn’t realise that REPS was such a small school. From the Kezi Road, it seemed to be a large complex. In fact, many of the buildings belong to the Matopos Research Station. REPS only has about 120 pupils! Of which about 80 are boarders. The classrooms are built around a quadrangle, very much in the colonial style.

P1260398.jpg P1260397

The school hall (above.)


This last photo is a building now used as a library. It’s built with iron sheeting walls. Anyone who grew up in Zimbabwe will recall these buildings – many of the government offices were initially built this way, as were railway housing, offices and sheds. This building is likely to be one of the oldest buildings in the complex.

I hope you enjoyed this walk around an historic school with me. If you did, please comment below or click the *follow* button to receive posts in your email.

Old Strip Roads…


…Can still be seen in some places in Zimbabwe. Although built nearly 100 years ago, they have withstood the tests of time! Called strip roads because they only cover the road where the tyres go, they were much cheaper to build when developing a new nation. Zimbabwe is twice the size of the United Kingdom and three times the size of Ireland! Engineers charged with developing a country covered in thick bush, teeming with wild animals on a limited budget, came up with this idea. This section is from Bulawayo to the Victoria Falls. The road builders stuck to outcropping rocks as it provided a solid base for the road. When the wide tar road was constructed in the 1960’s, a shorter route over the top of the sand was chosen. (Ancient sand dunes are clearly visible on Satellite images from Lupane onwards.) This is what Wikipedia has to say:


If travellers came across someone driving in the opposite direction, both were expected to move over, so only their right wheels were on the left hand track! That’s pretty close when passing the on coming vehicle – takes some trust, that!


By the time I was a kid, there was only a small section remaining as part of our National Roads: between Filabusi and Belingwe (Now, Mberengwa.)


and I clearly remember my dad, cigarette between his fingers, elbow out of the window, only veering off to the left at the last possible moment – no reduction in speed!


I took this (silly) short video driving on the section of this road near the turn off to Hwange Main Camp, near Netchilibi…

Fast forward forty years…and these guys are not going as fast, but still using the road!


The day I took the above photo, the inbuilt temperature gauge in the car read 52 degrees C. In other words, very hot! And, we had to work outside in it…(I remained in the car with the air-conditioner running.)